Monthly Archives: January 2015

Manny Pacheco with Southern California TV, January 20, 2015

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Knox is the chairman and brought in Mr. Manny Pacheco. Manny Pacheco is currently a Southern California television and radio personality. His career has spanned over three decades. He co-hosted the Daytime Emmy-nominated In Studio on KCOP 13; and appeared on NBC’s Santa Barbara. He’s moderated public television pledge drives (KCET). Manny had a principal role in a documentary, Karaoke Fever, featured at the Los Angeles Film Festival in 2001. Pacheco received a Best Weblog accolade from the Los Angeles Press Club’s 54th Annual Southern California Journalism Awards.
President– Mychal Dourson; President Elect- Joe Sarnecky; Fundraising Chair- Mychal and Dave Jones; Public Relations Chair- Joshua Bernheim; Foundation Chair– Lee Russell; Membership Chair- Scott Cadwallader; New Generation Chair – Kate Rubalcava; Secretary- Rick Sharp; Treasurer–Rick Graham; Bell Notes 2 Manny is also a voice-over commercial actor, and clients have included FORD, GTE, ARCO, MILLER LITE and HONDA. He has worked on KRLA, KFI, and KBIG. He’s been a broadcaster in Los Angeles his entire career. He currently hosts FORGOTTEN HOLLYWOOD radio show on 15-10 Financial News & Talk on the Astor Broadcasting Group. Pacheco is a thirty-year member of the Screen Actors Guild, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists and the youngest member of Pacific Pioneer Broadcasters. Manny wrote an article about his experience at the 2008 Screen Actors Guild Awards that appeared on LA Radio.com and in Karaoke Scene Magazine. Manny has had the pleasure of speaking at 60 different Rotary club meetings in Orange County and Los Angeles recalling a most memorable club meeting just outside Las Vegas but could not tell us any more, after all what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. Forgotten Hollywood Forgotten History is the first paperback in a series of award-winning books. His latest work, Son of Forgotten Hollywood Forgotten History, was published in January, 2012. His 3rd book is in the works! Manny went on to tell us of the interesting fact of Old Hollywood and how it ties to History. Lee Harvey Oswald, the man who killed John F. Kennedy– was arrested by police after a struggle in a Dallas movie theater soon after the shooting on Nov. 22, 1963. But do you know what was playing? Cry of Battle, a World War II epic starring Van Heflin, James MacArthur (Danno of “Book ‘em, Danno” fame) and Rita Moreno; and War Is Hell, set during the Korean Conflict and featuring Audie Murphy as the narrator. It was this second film that Oswald caught a few moments of before he added assaulting an officer, resisting arrest, reaching for a concealed weapon, etc., to his list of crimes. If only he had taken two seconds to pay for a ticket instead of ducking in for free, thereby causing atheater employee to contact the police about it, who knows how long until Lee Harvey Oswald would have been apprehended? In 1943, a dog named Pal was chosen to play Lassie in MGM’s feature film, Lassie Come Home. Following his film debut, Pal starred in six more MGM Lassie films from the mid-1940s to early-1950s, then appeared briefly in shows, fairs, and rodeos around the United States before starring in the two pilots filmed in 1954 for the television series, Lassie. Pal retired after filming the television pilots, and died in 1958. He sired a line of descendants who continued to play the fictional character he originated. The Saturday Evening Post said Pal had “the most spectacular canine career in film history Jovial, somewhat flamboyant Frank Morgan (born Francis Wuppermann) will forever be remembered as the title character in The Wizard of Oz (1939), but he was a veteran and respected actor long beforehe played that part, and turned in outstanding performances both before and after that film. One of 11children of a wealthy manufacturer, Morgan followed his older brother, Ralph Morgan (born Raphael Wuppermann) into the acting profession, making his Broadway debut in 1914 and his film debut two years later. Morgan specialized in playing courtly, sometimes eccentric or befuddled but ultimately
President– Mychal Dourson; President Elect- Joe Sarnecky; Fundraising Chair- Mychal and Dave Jones; Public Relations Chair- Joshua Bernheim; Foundation Chair– Lee Russell; Membership Chair- Scott Cadwallader; New Generation Chair – Kate Rubalcava; Secretary- Rick Sharp; Treasurer–Rick Graham; Bell Notes 3 sympathetic characters, such as the alcoholic telegraph operator in The Human Comedy (1943) or the shop owner in The Shop Around the Corner (1940). He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor for The Affairs of Cellini (1934). Frank Morgan died at age 59 of a heart attack on September 18, 1949 in Beverly Hills, California Lionel Barrymore starred in a number of silent works, including The Battle (1911), The New York Hat (1912) and His Secret (1913)—which also marked Barrymore’s directorial debut. Barrymore also continued to perform on stage, starring in several Broadway productions. That would soon change, however: In 1925, Barrymore moved to Hollywood, California, and signed a lifetime deal with a MGM. Over the next two decades, the actor would be widely regarded as one of film’s biggest stars. By the late 1930s, severe arthritis had led Barrymore to be confined to a wheelchair. His physical state was incorporated into his new roles, most notably as Dr. Gillespie in Young Dr. Kildare (1938), which spawned a dozen sequels—all of them starring Barrymore. In 1946, Barrymore played the despicable and wheelchair-bound Henry Potter in the Frank Capra holiday classic It’s a Wonderful Life, also starring Jimmy Stewart and Donna Reed. Two years later, Barrymore teamed up with Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in the thriller Key Largo (1948). Barrymore due to his illness opened up the door to the world of movies making persons with disability “acceptable” to view on screen and even inspired people like Helen Keller to so to his movies even though she could not see no hear. Mr. Pacheco gave one of the most animated presentations our club has seen. He has the ability to tell a story making the impression so vivid in your mind. Great job Manny Pacheco, and thank you for sharing. His two books are available for sale on Amazon.com.