Monthly Archives: March 2015

Connie Jones March 31, 2015

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Connie Jones was introduced by her proud husband, Dr. Jones. He may have been rusty on dates but he knew her story! Connie was born in Toledo, Ohio, and raised in Adrian, Michigan before landing in Santa Monica for High School. She graduated from Orange CA high school. Connie attended LA County Hospital nurses training. She was swept off her feet by a dashing intern, Dr. Dave Jones. They married and lived in San Francisco briefly, before settling in Santa Rosa for Dave’s residency. They moved to So Cal in 1968. The Jones’ have 2 children, 1 granddaughter, who will be celebrating her 21st birthday soon. Connie and Dr. Jones are looking forward to their upcoming 50th wedding anniversary!! Connie was a school nurse at St. Francis School. She retired about 5 years ago and began to volunteer with the Tri City Hospital Auxiliary. Connie was the President of the Auxiliary last year.She especially enjoys her volunteer positions with most contact with the public: Front Door greeter & Information Desk. The Tri-City Hospital Auxiliary was formed in 1961, even before the hospital was dedicated. It is unique in that it is independently run from the hospital with no paid employees or director. They have their own By-laws and Board of Directors. It is a very financially stable organization that provides both volunteer and economic support to our community hospital.

The Auxiliary started with the “pink ladies” and has grown into a self-sufficient group of 688 members who gave 78,000 volunteer hours of service in both 2013 & 2014. The Auxiliary provides 450 volunteers a month to help free up nursing staff for their jobs, assist hospital goers with their challenging days and to bring a little happiness to all. Volunteers pay a small $10 membership fee, must commit to 100 hours per year (2 4hr shifts a month for adults), attend an orientation, have a TB test and annual flu vaccine, background test and learn the hospital codes, rules & HIPPA regulations. Volunteers purchase their own uniforms. Volunteers can work in several areas: clerical, behavioral health, courtesy shuttle, valet parking, customer registration, emergency dept., employee health, escort service (Knox wants to learn more about this), Gift shop, Greeter at the front door, Imaging Radiology, Information desk, Human Resources, ICU, lab, Maternal, neonatal, pet therapy, registration, rehabilitation, pre-op(Jackie Russell volunteers in Pre-op), Telecare for shut-ins, Telemetry cardio monitoring, Wellness center and the Women’s Diagnostic Center. The Auxiliary delivers a UT newspaper to hospital patients daily. They are there to orient patients and visitors and to be an advocate with patients having pain or needing help. The smiling faces of the volunteers can help to alleviate stress for patients. They share in patients’ grief and joy. They support the hospital staff to help them be able to give their best to the patients.

The Tri-City Auxiliary has raised $100,000 in the gift shop. They gave back $80,000 to the hospital last year, give $65,000 in scholarships. Some scholarships are for nurses to get specialized certification in areas such as Diabetic education or Critical Care nursing. They also give $1000 scholarships to Junior Volunteers for college. Nursing scholarships are granted for students enrolled at Mira Costa and Palomar. Fundraising is done in the community, through the annual Cookie Extravaganza, Tails on the Trail pet therapy event. The Tri-City Hospital Auxiliary is the upcoming recipient of the HAVE Award from the America Hospital Foundation for their work in reaching out to the community. Thank you Connie & Jackie and all of the volunteers for all you do!

Cory Scurlock – Big Brothers and Sisters – March 24, 2015

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JoAnn introduced our speaker from the Big Brothers Big Sisters of San Diego County, 

Cory Scurlock. Cory has a master’s degree in teaching and counseling psychology and has taught in public schools and as a director in a learning center. She has been associated with Big Brothers Big Sisters for the past year.

Cory spoke about the part of the program with which she is associated, Operation Bigs. This is a school-based program for military families and currently is operational in five elementary schools at Camp Pendleton. Volunteer mentors meet with their little brothers and sisters (ages 7-13) at their school for one hour one day a week to play games or sports or other fun activities, but most of all to build a friendship with the youngster and become a part of his/her extended family. The “Bigs” are matched with their “Littles” according to shared interests.

There is also a community division of Big Brothers Big Sisters in which ‘Bigs” can take their “Littles” to ball games, Sea World and the Zoo or other outings.

All volunteers are screened with a background check and interview to especially explore any abuse that they may have sustained as a child. A $25 contribution is requested to cover the cost of the background check.

In addition to volunteers, Big Brothers Big Sisters needdonated basketballs, Play-Doh, art supplies and wall balls (whatever they are).

Fernanda Torres – Rotary Exchange Program – March 17, 2015

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Julie introduced the speaker Fernanda Torres. Fernanda is a member of the SD Coastal Rotary Club but shares her time between her native Tijuana Mexico and San Diego. Her involvement in Rotary began in 1996 when she was a Rotary Exchange Student to Turkey. This year-long experience had a profound impact on her life. Instead of referring to it as a “year of life” she considered it “life in a year.” She had certain stereotypes of what life would be like in Muslim Turkey that were reinforced by her family and father. One was that women are persecuted and discriminated against in Turkey. What she found was just the opposite. For example, her sponsoring club from Mexico was at the time an all-male club, the host club in Turkey not only allowed women, but the president was a woman! Also, the Prime Minister of Turkey was a woman. Clearly, incorrect, pre-conceived prototypes were rapidly broken down and the experience was described as “eye opening” which she shared with her family and host Rotary club when she returned. One of the main goals of the Rotary Exchange program is to promote peace and understanding through cultural exchange. This happens in a very big and powerful way. Language was a barrier for Fernanda, but within about 3 months she was able to communicate in Turkish. She attended High School but also was very active with making hand-crafts which are very popular among the young women in Turkey. She was proactive and actually set up a fundraising opportunity between clubs in the US and Mexico to sell the handicrafts. Since, this has grown into a blossoming industry and jobs for the village. In addition to her professional work as an attorney, Fernanda is the Rotary Exchange Program Administrator for Mexico District 4100 and currently has 52 students abroad. She strongly urged us to become involved in Youth Exchange, hosting and sending students as well as supporting the Rotary Model U.N. Globally, Rotary does about 8500 youth exchanges per year.   She shared a potential community service project in Tijuana Mexico: http://www.lucasfamilyfoundation.org/

Fernanda Torres-SD Coastal Rotary Club-17,March,2015

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Julie introduced the speaker Fernanda Torres.Fernanda is a member of the SD Coastal Rotary Club but shares her time between her native Tijuana Mexico and San Diego. Her involvement in Rotary began in 1996 when she was a Rotary Exchange Student to Turkey. This year-long experience had a profound impact on her life. Instead of referring to it as a “year of life” she considered it “life in a year.”She had certain stereotypes of what life would be like in Muslim Turkey that were reinforced by her family and father. One was that women are persecuted and discriminated against in Turkey. What she found was just the opposite. For example, her sponsoring club from Mexico was at the time an all-male club, the host club in Turkey not only allowed women, but the president was a woman! Also, the Prime Minister of Turkey was a woman. Clearly, incorrect, pre-conceived prototypes were rapidly broken down and the experience was described as “eye opening” which she shared with her family and host Rotary club when she returned. One of the main goals of the Rotary Exchange program is to promote peace and understanding through cultural exchange. This happens in a very big and powerful way. Language was a barrier for Fernanda, but within about 3 months she was able to communicate in Turkish. She attended High School but also was very active with making hand-crafts which are very popular among the young women in Turkey. She was proactive and actually set up a fundraising opportunity between clubs in the US and Mexico to sell the handicrafts. Since, this has grown into a blossoming industry and jobs for the village. In addition to her professional work as an attorney, Fernanda is the Rotary Exchange Program Administrator for Mexico District 4100 and currently has 52 students abroad. She strongly urged us to become involved in Youth Exchange, hosting and sending students as well as supporting the Rotary Model U.N. Globally, Rotary does about 8500 youth exchanges per year. She shared a potential community service project in Tijuana Mexic:

Debbie Allen – Oceanside YMCA – March 3, 2015

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Debbie Allen presented on the YMCA of Oceanside. Debbie Allen is the current immediate past chair of the Joe and Mary Mottino YMCA in Oceanside. She was Chair from 2012 thru 2013 and had served on the YMCA board since 2008.

Debbie has a passion to serve her community and also served as Chairman of the Oceanside Chamber of Commerce and KOCT, “The Oceanside Channel”. She was also a former RYLA counselor.

When she is not serving the community she is the General Manager of Eternal Hills Memorial Park, Mortuary and Crematory.

Debbie has lived in Oceanside since 2002, has 2 adult children, 4 grandchildren and her 2 dogs Maggie and Cricket.

The philosophy of YMCA is that when people get stronger our community grows. There are over 2500 YMCA’s all over the world.

The Oceanside YMCA offers a Child Watch service that provides for their gym, but also with associated after school programs and offers date nights for parents. The Child Watch includes no TV’s.

The YMCA doesn’t like to turn people away, and will offer discounts based on income. People usually pay something, however, to be sure the services are valued.

The Oceanside YMCA has a pool and offers swim lessons and other events.

YMCA also offers an Advertise Guides program of family events.

While the Oceanside YMCA has a $3M budget, donations help close the gap. The goal for this year is $180,000 in fundraising, and they’re already at about $140,000. Donations go toward operating expenses, and help close the gap.

Several members of our club are annual donors to the YMCA.

-Josh