Monthly Archives: September 2015

Fernando Sanudo, CEO of the Vista Community Clinic Sept 22, 2015

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Our program today was provided by Fernando Sanudo, CEO of the Vista Community Clinic. He was introduced by Dave Jones, who related his role in establishing the Oceanside Community Clinic with Dodie Rotherham, a Red Cross nurse. This was done to provide medical care for patients who couldn’t afford to purchase medical insurance but made too much money to qualify for MediCal. It actually started a year or two before the Vista Community Clinic and was eventually absorbed by the latter.

Fernando joined the Vista Community Clinic in 1988 as a health educator and has served in many positions with the Clinic prior to becoming CEO.

VCC offers a variety of services, including adult and family medicine, pediatrics, women’s health, family planning, behavioral health, dental services and optometry. They accept most insurances, including MediCal and also offer a sliding scale for patients who do not have insurance, starting at about $40.

The Clinic cares for about 57,000patients and about 214,000 patient visits annually. About 15-20% of their patients are farm workers and their dependents
VCC Delivers 1000-1200 babies per year and about 10% are teenagers. Recently they had a pregnant twelve year old girl and the father wasn’t much older. The Clinic hires B & C grade high school students to work in the clinic in entry level positions and several have gone onto nursing or medical programs. The Clinic will be having a Casino Night fundraiser in November and they also sponsor a tour of decorated homes in Vista at Christmastime, much like the one sponsored in Oceanside by the Oceanside Library. Opportunity drawing winner: Lee Russell, I believe. I know that he didn’t win as much as Jordan Spieth did this weekend.

 

Vista Community Clinic–Fernando Sanudo

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Our program today was provided by Fernando Sanudo, CEO of the Vista Community Clinic. He was introduced by Dave Jones, who related his role in establishing the Oceanside Community Clinic with Dodie Rotherham, a Red Cross nurse. This was done to provide medical care for patients who couldn’t afford to purchase medical insurance but made too much money to qualify for MediCal. It actually started a year or two before the Vista Community Clinic and was eventually absorbed by the latter.

Fernando joined the Vista Community Clinic in 1988 as a health educator and has served in many positions with the Clinic prior to becoming CEO. VCC offers a variety of services, including adult and family medicine, pediatrics, women’s health, family planning, behavioral health, dental services and optometry.

They accept most insurances, including MediCal and also offer a sliding scale for patients who do not have insurance, starting at about $40. The Clinic cares for about 57,000patients and about 214,000 patient visits annually. About 15-20% of their patients are farm workers and their dependents.

C delivers 1000-1200 babies per year and about 10% are teenagers. Recently they had a pregnant twelve year old girl and the father wasn’t much older. The Clinic hires B & C grade high school students to work in the clinic in entry level positions and several have gone onto nursing or medical programs. The Clinic will be having a Casino Night fundraiser in November and they also sponsor a tour of decorated homes in Vista at Christmastime, much like the one sponsored in Oceanside by the Oceanside Library.

Phil Lutgen Principal Trade Tech High School September 15, 2015

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Dave Jones introduced Phil Lutgen who is the principal of Trade Tech High of North County.  He’s been the principal for 4 years now.  He began his career in LA in the late 80’s and he was formerly a robotics teacher in Washington State.  TTH is a Charter High School with 160 students and 12 staff members.  They have a 16:1 class size and have the motto No Child Left Unknown!  The student body is comprised of 1/3 to ½ Oceanside, 1/3 to ½ Vista and the rest from surrounding towns of Carlsbad and Escondido. They have a high rate of graduation.  About a third go into apprenticeships, half go onto college and some into the military.  Last year only 2 did not graduate and 1 of them came back this year and finished!  The goal is to certify and get them on their path!

There is a huge movement in California to get more schools like Trade Tech.  The goal with charter schools is to create a different, smaller school system so they can try newer methods that can eventually be transferred into the larger schools.  A testing ground so to speak.

TTH offers degrees in many trades some of the newer offerings are:

Automotive – they don’t teach changing tires and oil but rather how the engine works.

Interior Design – this is taken with finish cabinetry. The students will be able to design it and make it! This is equivalent to 3 years of Palomar college credit .

They added Machine Shop this year thanks to $90k in donations.  There are 6 Sureline machines in their shop.  They have a partnership with the Craftmanship museum where students can display what they make.

The students found a teacher in house so they could add Bike Repair and Small Engines to the curriculum.

TTH has a strong Robotics team that has competed for 3 seasons.  In that time there have been 4 competitions.  They placed as follows:

1st – 1st place went to St. Louis

2nd – Lost

3rd – 1st place

4th – 2nd place of 59 teams, the 1st place team was Mrs. Lutgen’s team from San Pasqual

 

We were given a demonstration of the robot that competed in the Recycle Rush.  The robot was compared to a “nice BMW” at a cost of $47,000!  It took 300 hours and the work of 8 or 9 students to put it together.  They have 6 weeks plus 2 days to design, proto-type, build and ship to the competition. The robot is programmed in JAVA and uses a wi-fi router drive through a computer which gives commands to the central board.  Josar Rosales and Jonathan Studinka were operating the robot and stacking recycle bins and moving them around the room.

Josar is a sophomore at TTH and wants to be an auto mechanic.  He already has 7 years of experience in this field.  Jonathan is a junior and wants to do something where he uses his hands, he said he won’t be happy sitting behind a desk.  He’s leaning towards the construction trade. 

Phil Lutgen 9/15/15

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Dave Jones introduced Phil Lutgen who is the principal of Trade Tech High of North County. He’s been the principal for 4 years now. He began his career in LA in the late 80’s and he was formerly a robotics teacher in Washington State. TTH is a Charter High School with 160

students and 12 staff members. They have a 16:1 class size and have the motto No Child Left Unknown! The student body is comprised of 1/3 to ½ Oceanside, 1/3 to ½ Vista and the rest from surrounding towns of Carlsbad and Escondido. They have a high rate of graduation. About a third go into apprenticeships, half go onto college and some into the military. Last year only 2 did not graduate and 1 of them came back this year and finished! The goal is to certify and get them on their path!
There is a huge movement in California to get more schools like Trade Tech. The goal with charter schools is to create a different, smaller school system so they can try newer methods that can eventually be transferred into the larger schools. A testing ground so to speak.
TTH offers degrees in many trades some of the newer offerings are:
Automotive – they don’t teach changing tires and oil but rather how the engine works.
Interior Design – this is taken with finish cabinetry. The students will be able to design it and make it! This is equivalent to 3 years of Palomar college credit .
They added Machine Shop this year thanks to $90k in donations. There are 6 Sureline machines in their shop. They have a partnership with the Craftmanship museum where students can display what they make.

The students found a teacher in house so they could add Bike Repair and Small Engines to the curriculum.
TTH has a strong Robotics team that has competed for 3 seasons. In that time there have been 4 competitions. They placed as follows:
1st – 1st place went to St. Louis
2nd – Lost
3rd – 1st place
4th – 2nd place of 59 teams, the 1st place team was Mrs. Lutgen’s team from San Pasqual

We were given a demonstration of the robot that competed in the Recycle Rush. The robot was compared to a “nice BMW” at a cost of $47,000! It took 300 hours and the work of 8 or 9 students to put it together. They have 6 weeks plus 2 days to design, proto-type, build and ship to the competition. The robot is programmed in JAVA and uses a wi-fi router drive through a computer which gives commands to the central board. Josar Rosales and Jonathan Studinka were operating the robot and stacking recycle bins and moving them around the room.
Josar is a sophomore at TTH and wants to be an auto mechanic. He already has 7 years of experience in this field. Jonathan is a junior and wants to do something where he uses his hands, he said he won’t be happy sitting behind a desk. He’s leaning towards the construction trade.

Mani Pashmforoush Heart Irregularities September 8, 2015

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Clinical Care Coordinator, Lydia Serrin introduced Doctor Mani Pashmforoush, MD. Doc Mani or Pash as he is referred to, heads up the Electrophysiology and General Cardiology Department at theTri-City Medical Center. Dr. Pash gave an enlightening program regarding the Tri-City Cardiology & Arrhythmia Services. They include; Lexican and Exercise nuclear stress testing, Stress Echocardiograms, E-Holter Event Monitoring, Coumadin Monitoring, 24 hour Holter and Blood Pressure Monitoring, ABI (to evaluate peripheral arterial disease), and finally EECP (Enhanced External Counter Pulsation).

 

Doctor Pash indicated that females show a high risk of stroke due to Atrial Fibrillation. The symptoms of this condition include, but are not limited to; Arrhythmia (erratic heart beat), Rheumatic Fever, Heart Disease, persistent sore throat, high blood pressure, and flutters in the chest area.

 

Treatment for the condition include but are not limited to; Coumadin (Warfarin) and other blood thinners (recommended after age of 65 years), beta blockers, pacemaker, and defibrillator.

 

Based on the questions from the audience, as well as Dr. Pash’s  presentation and answers that he provided, this is an important topic and he strongly urged the members to maintain a healthy diet, coupled with a good exercise program and closely monitoring your individual blood pressure and finally visiting a specialist for diagnostic testing should the symptoms persist.

 

Nurse Lydia Serrin indicated that the expenses for monitoring and testing are significantly decreased in cost for merely contributing to the Tri-City Foundation. Thank you Doctor Mani and Lydia!!

Lydia Serrin introduced Doctor Mani Pashmforoush Sept. 8, 2015

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Clinical Care Coordinator, Lydia Serrin introduced Doctor Mani Pashmforoush, MD. Doc Mani or Pash as he is referred to, heads up the Electrophysiology and General Cardiology Department at theTri-City Medical Center.

Dr. Pash gave an enlightening program regarding the Tri-City Cardiology & Arrhythmia Services. They include; Lexican and Exercise nuclear stress testing, Stress Echocardiograms, E-Holter Event Monitoring, Coumadin Monitoring, 24 hour Holter and Blood Pressure Monitoring, ABI (to evaluate peripheral arterial disease), and finally EECP (Enhanced External Counter Pulsation). Doctor Pash indicated that females show a high risk of stroke due to Atrial Fibrillation.

The symptoms of this condition include, but are not limited to; Arrhythmia (erratic heart beat), Rheumatic Fever, Heart Disease, persistent sore throat, high blood pressure, and flutters in the chest area. Treatment for the condition include but are not limited to; Coumadin (Warfarin) and other blood thinners (recommended after age of 65 years), beta blockers, pacemaker, and defibrillator. Based on the questions from the audience, as well as Dr. Pash’s presentation and answers that he provided, this is an important topic and he strongly urged the members to maintain a healthy diet, coupled with a good exercise program and closely monitoring your individual blood pressure and finally visiting a specialist for diagnostic testing should the symptoms persist. Nurse Lydia Serrin indicated that the expenses for monitoring and testing are significantly decreased in cost for merely contributing to the Tri-City Foundation. Thank you Doctor Mani and Lydia!!

Larry Kesslin Success Redefined September 1, 2015

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Larry Kesslin, a member of the Carlsbad Hi-Noon Rotary Club spoke on why it feels so
good to be a Rotarian. He wants to help people become Rotarians, not necessarily Rotary
club members. Think about it, doing good things for others not only make them feel good, you
also benefit from giving and you too feel good about what you have done. That’s probably one
of the reasons we all became Rotarians in the first place. Larry worked for G.E. for over 22
years before he called it quits and asked himself “why am I here”. He feels that each one of us
was put here for a specific reason. Our job is to find out what that “reason” is. He has written
a book called “Why it feels So Good to Be a Rotarian”. He also explained the difference
between a “want” and a “need”. Each one of us needs to figure out: what we need in life, why
am I here, and then find your purpose in life. Go out and find other Rotarians in your
communities!

Greg Morones Sept. 1, 2015

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Larry Kesslin, a member of the Carlsbad Hi-Noon Rotary Club spoke on why it feels so good to be a Rotarian.He wants to help people become Rotarians, not necessarily Rotary club members. Think about it, doing good things for others not only make them feel good, you also benefit from giving and you too feel good about what you have done. That’s probably one of the reasons we all became Rotarians in the first place. Larry worked for G.E. for over 22 years before he called it quits and asked himself “why am I here”.

He feels that each one of us was put here for a specific reason. Our job is to find out what that “reason” is. He has written a book called “Why it feels So Good to Be a Rotarian”. He also explained the difference between a “want” and a “need”. Each one of us needs to figure out: what we need in life, whyam I here, and then find your purpose in life. Go out and find other Rotarians in yourcommunities! Opportunity drawing winner: Greg Morones. $30.00 and $25 bucks ahead for the day.