Monthly Archives: November 2017

Lee Russell- US Marine Corps – Nov 29, 2017

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Today’s program was an idea by Lee Russell to recognize veterans in our club from who have served in the military. Club members (and two guests) were asked to give a brief overview of their service.

First up was Alice Williamson, a guest of Lee’s who served in the Women Marines during WWII as a personnel clerk. She said that she selected the Marine Corps because she liked their uniform best. She was proud to sign up, because basically, her work during the war “freed up a man to fight.” Following the war, she married a career marine officer and they were married for 59 years. Alice is currently a very spry 98 years old.

Next up was Knox Williams who served in the post WWII Naval Reserve, and had several deployments on an Aircraft Carrier and Destroyer Escort ships. Lee Russell entered the armed services toward the end of the Korean War. When he was drafted, he was given a 30-day deferment to complete his current semester in college. While in basic training the fighting stopped and he was deployed to Germany, where he served as a clerk at the 7th Army Headquarters. Scott Cadwallader was in the Army from 1970-1973. He was trained as a radar repairman, and spent 18 months in Okinawa and 6 months in Key West serving in the Army Air Defense Command at Nike missile batteries.

Rick Graham graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1970 and attended flight school. He flew helicopters off the Southern California coast for five years before a seizure ended a promising naval career.

Dave Jones was an Army Physician who served in Vietnam from 1964-1965. This was the period just prior to an escalation of hostilities. Much of his time was spent going out into the villages and providing primary care services to the local Vietnamese community. Joe Sarnecky was a naval aviator, first as a Radar Intercept Officer (or RIO) in the back seat of the F-4 fighter during the Vietnam War. He then qualified for the “front seat” and earned his pilot’s wings in 1971. He was later in the Naval Reserves and retired as a Commander. During his years flying, he engaged in 200 combat missions and had 525 carrier landings.

Our second guest (thanks to Josh) was Todd Fowler who served in the US Marine Corps from 2004-2012. He was an infantryman first and then switched his military specialty to air control. He had several deployments to both Iraq and Afghanistan. Our thanks to Lee for a great program idea, and a special thanks to all of our veterans for their service.

Robin Douglas – Oceanside Art Museum and community – Nov 28, 2017

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Our program this week was Robin Douglas, who discussed Contemporary Art. Robin has been an art professor and has been involved with the Oceanside Art Museum and community for many years. Contemporary art refers to art that is “now”or“today.” It is also inspired by political and social influences. However, it isn’t just current art. Many artists from the early 20th century, and even some works in the 19th century are considered “contemporary art.”She also discussed the impact that art has on a city’s reputation. According to statistics, more people visit art galleries than all sporting events and churches combined. The greatest draw to a city is its reputation for art. Robin reviewed the work of a number of renowned contemporary artists. She mentioned that Impressionist artists are always incorporating the latest technologies, and that true artists are constantly creating new approaches and styles. Art transcends culture and time and should make us think. There are so many different styles and there is no “right way” or right answers. Art is all about a person’s perception and what appeals to each individual.

Scott Carr – past President of SD Downtown Breakfast club – Nov 14, 2017

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Rotary District 5340 Governor Scott Carr was the past President of SD Downtown Breakfast club as well as the website architect for the district. He has worked in estate and financial planning. The typical DG speech is a collection of “Rotary Moments” but Scott was to do something different with his talk. The Rotary District 5340 is very large and diverse in geography and membership. Currently it is 33% women and this needs to be increased since women outnumber men in society. Also, Rotary needs more minorities of all kinds to better reflect the communities that it serves. Change is a part of life and personal change is often glorified and celebrated, just look at all the popular “self-help” improvement books in the best-seller list. However, people don’t like their organizations to change because it is scary. However, organizations must change to remain relevant and Rotary must do the same. We must embrace change and get excited by it. It can be how we communicate (most young people communicate on social media) and how we serve.

We need to tell our Rotary Story and do a better job of “tooting the horn” for Rotary. This can be done easily through the modern communication on mobile devices and personal computers. TED speaker Simon Sinek talks about how organizations describe themselves by using the “golden circle” where the outside ring is the “what”, next inside the “how” and the center is the “why.”Most start with the “what” and that is the wrong approach because it doesn’t inspire people to buy in. We must start with the “why” which is the personal Rotary story for each of us. So, when explaining Rotary to someone new, start with your personal Rotary story and convey “why”Rotary is so great and they will have a much greater chance of wanting to get involved. Scott likes Rotary so much because “It shines a light where there is darkness – anywhere on Earth!

Kern – Councilman – Nov 7, 2017

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Kern is a City Councilman from Oceanside and is a candidate for Dan Diego County District 5 Supervisor. He is a veteran of the Air Force and former President of the Chamber of Commerce, Teacher, and San Diego County Water Authority. Jerry is on the Community Engagement Panel for the Decommissioning of the San Onofre Nuclear Power Station. The decommissioning involves moving fuel rods from the wet storage in 23 feet of water, into temporary dry cask storage containers that are stranded fuel sites, encased in cement, and passively cooled. This storage is about 150 yards from the ocean. The fuel rods are pencil thin and 12 feet long. Permanent sites need an act of Congress and could be located in Texas and New Mexico. Time frame to move fuel rods is unknown at this time. Unit 1 was put into service in 1968 and retired in 1992. Unit 2 was 1983 to 2012 and Unit 3 was 1984 to 2012. Once the fuel rods are relocated to dry storage, work will begin on the dismantling of the Domes – which should conclude in 2023. The decommissioning cost is 4.4 Billion dollars, but has already been paid for by fees on users over the past forty years. The property belongs to the Navy and will ultimately be returned to them in the condition it was when construction started. The total spent fuel rods at the site weigh 1609 metric tons. There are currently three more nuclear sites in California in various stages of operation/decommissioning – Humboldt Bay, Rancho Seco, and Diablo Canyon. Jerry said that anyone who would like a tour of the facility could contact him at the Oceanside City Council office. For more information, visit songscommunity.com

Jerry Kern-City Councilman-7,Nov,2017

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Jerry Kern is a City Councilman from Oceanside and is a candidate for Dan Diego County District 5 Supervisor. He is a veteran of the Air Force and former President of the Chamber of Commerce, Teacher, and San Diego County Water Authority.
Jerry is on the Community Engagement Panel for the Decommissioning of the San Onofre Nuclear Power Station. The decommissioning involves moving fuel rods from the wet storage in 23 feet of water, into temporary dry cask storage containers that are stranded fuel sites, encased in cement, and passively cooled. This storage is about 150 yards from the ocean. The fuel rods are pencil thin and 12 feet long. Permanent sites need an act of Congress and could be located in Texas and New Mexico. Time frame to move fuel rods is unknown at this time.
Unit 1 was put into service in 1968 and retired in 1992. Unit 2 was 1983 to 2012 and Unit 3 was 1984 to 2012. Once the fuel rods are relocated to dry storage, work will begin on the dismantling of the Domes – which should conclude in 2023. The decommissioning cost is 4.4 Billion dollars, but has already been paid for by fees on users over the past forty years.
The property belongs to the Navy and will ultimately be returned to them in the condition it was when construction started. The total spent fuel rods at the site weigh 1609 metric tons. There are currently three more nuclear sites in California in various stages of operation/decommissioning – Humboldt Bay, Rancho Seco, and Diablo Canyon.

Jerry said that anyone who would like a tour of the facility could contact him at the Oceanside City Council office.
For more information, visit songscommunity.com